Journal policies around peer review: TRANSPOSE project under way at #TriangleSci

Journal policies around peer review: TRANSPOSE project under way at #TriangleSci

As part of our effort to increase transparency about the role of early career researchers in peer review, we are trying to collect data on the policies that journals have implemented with respect to involvement of early career researchers. Particularly we are looking at how transparent co-reviewer policies are, and whether expectations around co-reviewing are made clear.

 

We are part of a collaborative project, TRANsparency in Scholarly Publishing for Open Scholarship Evolution or TRANSPOSE, currently working on gathering this and other data about scholarly publishing as part of the Scholarly Communication Institute 2018 Meeting in Chapel Hill, NC, where the theme is “Overcoming Risk“. One of the risks identified in our project is the risk ECRs face when it comes to ensuring their scholarly contribution is recognized.

 

You can find more information below, but follow along on Twitter with #TriangleSci for our updates – today’s work is populating the database with a subset of journals in the life, health and chemical sciences to have some data to work with.

 

If you want to find out more, please read below or check out the TRANSPOSE site – and stay tuned!

 

What is TRANSPOSE?

TRANSPOSE (TRANsparency in Scholarly Publishing for Open Scholarship Evolution) is a grassroots project to crowdsource journal policies on peer review and preprints. The project is a collaborative effort across a number of different organizations dedicated to making publishing more transparent. Future of Research is particularly interested in the component you can search below – which journals allow co-reviewers to be named!

 

Why TRANSPOSE?

Journal policies on peer review and preprints are variable and complex. Existing databases (such as SHERPA/RoMEO and Publons) contain some, but not all, of this information.

 

 

How can I help?

 

If you’d like to add data (which you can see below and at our #ECRPeerReview resource) please go to the TRANSPOSEwebsite, click on the journal you’d like to update, and enter the information!

If you can’t find a journal by searching below, you can add a new record by clicking here.

 

What’s next?

The TRANSPOSE project has been accepted as part of the Scholarly Communication Institute 2018 Meeting in Chapel Hill, NC. This year’s meeting theme is “Overcoming Risk“, and one of the risks identified in our project is the risk ECRs face when it comes to ensuring their scholarly contribution is recognized. ECRs may feel hesitant to contribute to peer review done in the name of their supervisor; and supervisors may not disclose names of others involved in review where journal policies suggest such common practices may have punitive consequences. Providing appropriate and ethical credit for their involvement would reduce their risk.

 

This working conference, bringing together members of our team from around the world, will be used to improve and expand upon our efforts. The members of the team include Dr. Jessica Polka (ASAPbio), Dr. Jennifer Lin (CrossRef), Dr. Benedikt Fecher (Humboldt Institute for Internet and Society), Dr. Samantha Hindle (bioRxiv), Dr. Tony Ross-Hellauer (Know-Center GmbH) and Dr. Gary McDowell (FoR).

 

Show me the data already!

You can click on the link in the final column to update a journal. If you can’t find a journal by searching below, you can add a new record by clicking here. You can also always find this (and more) information at our#ECRPeerReview resource.

 

For the related database on preprint policies, see the resource at ASAPbio here.

 

Journal Co-reviewer policy Link to policy Does journal invitation email make clear that co-reviewers can contribute? Can co-reviewers get credit? Does journal deposit peer reviewer activity into any open databases? Link to credit policy Dedicated place in submission form to identify co-reviewers? Link to edit journal info
Advanced Materials Unsure Partnered with Publons
Agricultural and Forest Meteorology
Annals of Medicine and Surgery
Biophysical Journal
Cell Partnered with Publons
Chemical Reviews No Unsure Partnered with Publons No
Chemical Society Reviews Unsure Partnered with Publons Unsure
College Student Journal Unsure No mention/unsure
Computer Methods and Programs in Biomedicine they are informed about the possibility in the invitation and follow up letters and at the submission leve are asked if the has a co-review and what was their name, email and contribution. Yes Yes
Development In situations where a reviewer wishes to co-review an article with a junior member of their laboratory, they must abide by the same rules of confidentiality and publishing ethics, and be named as a co-reviewer on submission of the review to the journal. Yes
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